Transaction Windows Curtail All Kinds of Violence

We know that one-on-one authentic contact is the key to driving sales. So when it comes to bullet resistant transaction windows in retail settings, we tend to focus on finding ways to maximize contact between personnel and customers. We want to ensure worker safety, but we still don’t want that bullet proof barrier to create hassles and damage the bottom line.
Nonetheless, as this news footage from last August demonstrates, sometimes the absolute best policy is to minimize customer contact.

TRANSACTION WINDOWS STOP MORE THAN BULLETS

There’s no doubt: This lady is angry. Does she have a gun? Seems unlikely; she certainly never brandishes it. But does this store’s owner regret investing in a bullet proof transaction window? Not one bit.
Judging from the state this customer left the store in, just because she had no firearm didn’t mean she had no capacity to do harm. The clerk absolutely acted in everyone’s best interest when he locked down the transaction windows and let the enraged woman blow off steam, and then storm out. Had he tried to further negotiate, or even placate her, it’s easy to imagine the situation escalating quickly into a physical altercation or worse. By cutting off contact between the customer and staff, the transaction window system prevented this situation from tipping over into dangerous territory.

TRANSACTION WINDOWS IN AN EVOLVING LANDSCAPE

According to Jim Richards–a retail-space security expert and vice president of Total Security Solutions–this video showcases the most valuable functions of a transaction window system: Deterrence and disengagement.
“The threat landscape hasn’t changed,” Jim explains, “But it’s continued to evolve, and employers are more conscious of disgruntled people and their willingness to act out violently. You shut someone’s cable off, or they have a problem with their cell phone like this lady, they are not happy. So businesses install these transaction windows to protect their employees.”
Even in a situation where bullets seem unlikely, the ability to quickly lock down the transaction area is like throwing baking powder on a grease fire: You get some smoke and mess, but that fire goes out pretty quickly.
“If you let people get up in each other’s faces, if there’s that threat of someone laying hands on someone else, you wouldn’t believe how fast that can get absolutely out of control.” On a day-to-day basis, a transaction window system that easily disengages individuals involved in a heated dispute–even if no weapon is present–is an incredibly valuable tool.